Roadtrippin to Pushkar


It has hardly been a week since i came back from the Andamans. Normally, people would not feel like travelling, let alone on a motorcycle so soon. But then you know me! Where normal people stop, i begin!

The idea of doing a weekend ride occured to me as Aamir and I were sitting and chilling at my place. We had two days off and i had some (very little, mind you) spare cash. I could have saved it, but the amount was so insignificant that i decided to fuck it. I thought that if i did the ride, the experience would be much more worth it than the money in the bank. There were two major hurdles to the successful completion of the trip. First, to get Aamir (who’s fast approaching thirty and has the mentality very similar to, say, a turnip) up on his ass and preparing him for the trip; and secondly the constant nagging voice in my head which said that Pushkar and back in two days is impossible.

All doubts laid to rest, the day of the trip fast approached. By the time i got home after work, sorting out small mechanical issues on the bike, buying spares and collecting back-packs, it was nearly one in the morning. As per plan we were supposed to be out by 3:30, so we packed fast and settled down for an hour’s sleep.

Thanks to calls from a very supportive girlfriend and a very worried mother, we were up an running on schedule. Our first stop was at the ATM near IIT. From there we hit the NH8, which we would be following all the way to Ajmer.

Dope at the ATM
Dope at the ATM

We crossed Gurgaon at 4:15 in the morning. The expressway is a pleasure to drive in even during peak traffic and at this godforsaken hour of the day when we were practically the only people on the road, it was a whole new feeling altogether. The needle on the speedo stayed still at 120 kmph. Originally (and i attribute it to a late waking-up habit) i had thought that the sun would be out by five, around the time we are out of the NCR and hit the open stretches. But 5 rolled to 5:30 and 5:30 rolled to 6 and there was no signs of the sun. At one point of time i was even thinking that maybe we left at 2:30 instead of 3:30. But anyway, the sky lightened sometime after 6 and by 6:30, we were already within a 100 kms of Jaipur when we stooped at this dhaba for tea and smokes and some photos.

Shameless poser!
Shameless poser!
You know you are in Rajasthan when....
You know you are in Rajasthan when....

As we approached Jaipur, the highway got prettier and prettier. The landscape was increasingly getting rugged and we started seeing the first signs of the Aravallis.

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Delhi - Jaipur Highway
Aamir's helmet is too big for his head!
Aamir's helmet is too big for his head!
Bodhi on Dope!
Bodhi on Dope!

Soon we hit the turn which would allow us to by-pass Jaipur and continue on our way towards Ajmer. As soon as we hit the by-pass, the shy darkened and it started drizzling. I was seriously disappointed…first Andamans and now this! The rains must have a serious issue with me. No! Not this time, i pressed on the throttle and began speeding away…. for the next half an hour, we literally outran the storm brewing behind us. What a feeling!

Thats the feeling you get when you outrun the storm!
Thats the feeling you get when you outrun the storm!

If the Delhi-Jaipur stretch of the highway is ‘smooth’ then from Jaipur to Ajmer, it is a veritable Autobahn. Hills flank the wide tarmac on both sides and for the longest stretch, the surroundings were devoid of any human presence. I have never been on roads like this. The road eventually leads to Mumbai which is 1200 kms from Jaipur. The urge was great to keep driving and not stopping till i reached Mumbai…but not this time. Very soon, though!

NH8, somewhere between Jaipur and Ajmer
NH8, somewhere between Jaipur and Ajmer

By the time we crossed Jaipur on the by-pass it was 9:30 in the morning and our stomachs had started to growl in symphony. Aamir at this point started acting like a bitch that he is. He rejected all the highway dhabas that i wanted to go to. He wanted a nice, sanitised, clean, ‘family’ place. So after much searching, we stopped at this dhaba and got ourselves stuffed on some awesome pakodas and paneer paranthas.

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Pakodas
Pakodas

After this dhaba stop, we had to go on for another 80-85 kms where a state highway branched off from the NH8 towards Ajmer, and guess what… we completed this stretch in under 40 mins.

Giving Dope a breather

I got sun on my face!
I got sun on my face!

Aamir had been a very good boy to this point. But when he saw a Cafe Coffee Day outlet on the highway, he just could not resist himself. He started flailing his arms about, jumping on the backseat, threatening to jump off if i did not stop. So i had to. He marched in, sat on the most comfortable couch and ordered a cold coffee! Road tripping with such people is such a pain, i tell you!

Aamir finally finds 'his kinda place'
Aamir finally finds 'his kinda place'
Me in 'Aamir's kinda place'
Me in 'Aamir's kinda place'

Once we took the turn from the National Highway into the state highway, ther was a perceptable change in the landscape. Dhabas and petrol pumps were few and far between, as were the villages. Soon we reached Kishangarh, which marks the beginning of the ‘Marble Belt’. For centuries the hills in this area have been quarried for their white marble. 4o kms down the road branching towards the right are the fabled mines of Makrana, that supplied the unblemished white marble used for the construction of the Taj Mahal.

These hills were once very high. On the outskirts of Kishangarh
These hills were once very high. On the outskirts of Kishangarh
Kishangarh fort in the Distance
Kishangarh fort in the Distance

Soon after Kishangarh, we entered Ajmer. It is a rugged yet serene town located along the base of a line of lofty hills. At the centre of the town is the sprawling Maharana Pratap Sagar lake. Our plan was to go to the Dargah Sharif before continuing towards Pushkar, 15 kms from here. The Dargah is located insuide of the Ajmer’s busiest markets and since it was also Diwali, the crowd was unbelievable. So we decided to skip it and continue towards Pushkar. We would come back for the darshan the next day, on our way back to Delhi. We stopped for some time on the lawns beside the lake and took some pictures

Maharana Pratap Sagar, Ajmer
Maharana Pratap Sagar, Ajmer

In Pushkar, we were booked into the Pink Floyd Cafe, where the decor is psychadelic and the rooms are named after Pink Floyd albums. As Luck would have it, we were given the room called “Animals”. Anindita had a good laugh when i told her about it!

Pink Floyd Cafe
Pink Floyd Cafe
Interiors - First Floor
Interiors - First Floor
Interiors - Second Floor
Interiors - Second Floor
The Lounge
The Lounge

The hotel was spread across three floors. All floors had a hall into which all the surrounding rooms opened. The top floor was the restaurant cum lounge and on the terrace there is a landscaped garden as well as another seating area. The terrace provided amazing view of Pushkar and the surrounding hills.

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Pushkar From the terrace
Pushkar From the terrace
Pushkar From the terrace
Pushkar from the terrace
Pushkar from the terrace
Pushkar from the terrace - The Savitri Temple atop the hill watches over the town. We climbed the 700 steps leading to the temple in the evening
Pushkar from the terrace - The Savitri Temple atop the hill watches over the town. We climbed the 700 steps leading to the temple in the evening

When we reached the hotel, we were quite exhausted having slept for hardly an hour in the last day and a half. Aamir was all for going to sleep and i had to push the old man along. So tired of me prodding his ass, he came up to the restaurant where we sat flicking through magazines and taking pictures while we waited for our lunch to show itself.

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You talking to me?

The best part about the hotel though was this little girl called Appu. She is hardly two years old and is all over the place. She, without hesitation enters rooms of strangers and every half an hour, there is someone or the other returning her to the reception to her dad. She came to me and settled down on my lap and narrated me a story in her own language, made up of a lot of different undistinguishable sounds and hand gestures.

Appu!
Appu!

After a rather satisfactory and surprisingly delicious lunch, we went off to explore the town. To our great dismay, the lake was quite dry except for a puddle here and a puddle there. But on the upside, the ghats were gloriously deserted. There were hardly 10 people there and the architecture was brilliant. It is like Benaras, scaled down, built around a lake.

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There are more than 52 ghats at Pushkar. Each of the ghats leads either to a temple and in some cases, the courtyards of rich landowners and merchants.

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The deserted ghats at Pushkar
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A moment of quiet reflection
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Two people and a whole lot of piegeons - the recipe for serenity

Among the larger things in the picture like the clear blue sky and the deserted ghats there were these innocuous little corners which are equally attractive. This jaali window once had a view, but has since been blocked up by a wall of bricks.

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People have various methods of making a wish. In this case, some leave hand prints of themselves on the walls in vermillion. The last place i had seen this was at the Mmahamaya Temple, a shaktipeeth near Bilaspur, Chhattisgarh

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This babaji claims to have walked down from Rishikesh!

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This tree was the trippiest thing in all of Pushkar. Reminded me of the gnarled tree on the ramparts of the Hall of Gondor in Minos Terith.

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The old man was feeding his piegeons. Sometimes they ate from his hands while others sat on his shoulders and sometimes even on his head.

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Thats Aamir surveying the scene from his vantage point on the ghats

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More signs of worship!

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From the ghats we wandered off through the markets to the Brahma temple that makes Pushkar so unique. Apparantly, it is one of the only four Brahma Temples in the world. I thought it would be different from the other temples i had seen, but i was grossly disappointed. It was as commercial as any other big temple. There was nothing striking about its architecture too. I preferred to stay out while Aamir went in.

Outside the Brahma Temple
Outside the Brahma Temple
Hanumana himself!
Hanumana himself!
A rare sombre face on a festive day!
A rare sombre face on a festive day!
Goodies at the Pushkar Bazaar
Goodies at the Pushkar Bazaar

We walked a lot through the markets and the bylanes. I have seen lots of markets like this and there was hardly anything unique about it, except for the stalls that were selling a vast array of swords, daggers and other hacking / slashing / cutting paraphernelia.Owing to the huge influx of Israeli tourists, a lot of the shops had hoardings or posters in Hebrew! I hace heard about stuff like this in Himachal..but the first time that i am seeing one.

Before i came to Pushkar, i read some blogs and all of the raved about the malpuas at the sweet shops. So we decided to check it out. The sweet shops had spilled into the streets and there were heaps of Bangali sweets in makeshift stands in front of the shops. A little conversation with the halwaii inoformed us that Pushkar sweets are so famous that people come here from Ajmer. We asked for two plates of malpus and that stuff was outright delicious. I am not a big fan of sweets and crazy as it may sound, i hate if my sweets are… well..too sweet! But not this. It was soft and chewey and just the right amount of sweet. It was excellent. Aamir wanted to pack some for home, but as usual, he forgot!

The Pushkar Bazaar
The Pushkar Bazaar
from the 'Dali Shop'
from the 'Dali Shop'

From the markets, we drove to the base of a hill on the top of which is a temple dedicated to goddess Savitri, Brahma’s consort. A board at the base of the hill where the stairs start, informed us that we would have to climb 702 stairs to reach the temple. In the beginning the steps were of concrete and very comfortably spaced. About halfway up, the concrete disappears and the stairs are just made of the hillside rock, chiselled to have footholds. And very steep!

Didnt know back then how excruciating it would turn out to be
Didnt know back then how excruciating it would turn out to be
Pushkar viewed from the initial stages of the climb
Pushkar viewed from the initial stages of the climb
The valley...the road from Ajmer passes through it to reach Pushkar
The valley...the road from Ajmer passes through it to reach Pushkar

As you climb on, more and more of the surrounding wastelands show up. You can see the gap in the mountains through which the road from Ajmer enters Pushkar. You can see the town, so tiny that it seemed to fit in the fold of your hand. On the other side of the saucer shaped valley where Pushkar is located, you can see hills, one of them even topped by a temple. As you go higher, you can feel the vertical distance between you and the town increasing. What a place to build a temple!

and we climb a little higher
and we climb a little higher
...and higher
...and higher
The real climb!
The real climb!

There were a group of Vaishnav pilgrims from Bengal. Most of them were elderly couples from a lower middle class background. Many of them were visually aged while some were bent over and walked with sticks. All of them were climbing the steps… people who were slightly more able were helping the others. Others were shouting words of encouragement to others. A few of them chugged on, chanting ‘shakti dao, Ma!’

Faith Moves, literally!
Faith Moves, literally!

We finally made it to the top and so exhilerated were we about doing this, that we forgot about at least going to the temple. I guess, sometimes the test of faith (for lack of a proper word) is maybe, just to reach the right place. A sojourn that i am more than willing to make…where the journey itself becomes the destination.

We did it!
We did it!
View of Pushkar from the top
View of Pushkar from the top
A close-up
A close-up
:D
😀
Under his wings!
Under his wings!

We soent a lot of time on the top of the hill. The sun was just going down and the entire valley was bathed in the glorious orange light. There was a little cafe there and we just ordered large servings of water! The climb had completely drained. We sat on the chairs and looked at the sights unfold in front of our eyes. One by one and often in little groups pilgrims reached the top and were visuallly happy at the achievement. We decided it was time to go down when it started getting dark. The steps leading down looked even scarier while climbing down. The rocks were slippery and it was difficult to find a flat piece of stone. Help came in the form of a Sikh babaji (in the pic) advising me ‘Radhey, chappal utar lo’. It worked!

Descent, very Descent!
Descent, very Descent!
Sun switching off!
Sun switching off!
...until tomorrow!
...until tomorrow!
mystic notes!
mystic notes!

When we came down to the parking there was a man playing the instrument (i must find out the name). He stared off with hindi fil tunes. I asked him to play some folk tune and he obliged.

I had to get the rear brakes worked on so i took Dope to the “Shreeram Enfild Gairaj and Sarvice Canter”

How do so many Indians win the spelling bee?
How do so many Indians win the spelling bee?
How i wish, how i wish you were here, Anindita!
How i wish, how i wish you were here, Anindita!

We decided that we would go out for dinner again and we had seen this restaurant in the market which we kinda liked. It was a shack made on the terrace of a building. So we went ot the almost-empty Hard Rock Restaurant and ordered some sphaghetti and macaronis. Le less we say about the food, the better!

Hard Rock Restaurant!
Hard Rock Restaurant!
Fireworks - 1
Fireworks - 1
Fireworks - 2
Fireworks - 2

Reeling from tiredness and lack of sleep, we went to bed at 9:30 and woke up 12 hours later, fresh as flowers bathed in the autumn dew! All that was left for us to do was visit the Dargah and then head back to Delhi. So we decided to have a laid back Breakfast. We went up to the cafe upstairs and ordered the creamy lasagnas. While i waited a saw a copy of the book ‘Eat, Pray, Love’ that someone must have left behind. I picked it up and started reading. It was turning out quite interestingly actually, but can you blame a guy for putting down a book when a hot cheesy platter is laid in front of him?

I swear i was not posing for this one!
I swear i was not posing for this one!
Yeah yeah..Lennon and all!
Yeah yeah..Lennon and all!

On the road from Almer to Pushkar, you have to cross a mountain. There comes a point in the road, the highest pint from were you can see the land for miles and the road snaking through it across all impossible angles. While going to Pushkar we stopped here too but something went wrong with the camera and it just didnt click! Not this time, though!

The road to Pushkar!
The road to Pushkar!

The road cuts through solid rock at this point, creating a gateway of sorts. This photo was so overexposed that i had to convert to b/w just to make it visible!

Gateway to Pushkar!
Gateway to Pushkar!
I am tempted to use "Riders in the Storm".. but its too overused!
I am tempted to use "Riders in the Storm".. but its too overused!
All i desire... a life on the highway!
All i desire... a life on the highway!

We reached the main bazaar at Ajmer from where the road to the dargah begins and parked the bike. We deposited our luggage and helmets at a flower shop and proceeded towards the shrine. The road was covered with tinsel streamers which made it a very pretty sight!

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In my defence, i was not aware when the picture was taken
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Entrance to the Dargah!
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The Pilgrims!

SOME PICTURES OF THE DRIVE BACK FROM AJMER…

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Another hill...another temple crown
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The colours of Rajasthan
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Food, truck-driver style!
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A most delicious lunch!
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dilli abhi bhi kaafi dur hai
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The Highway!
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Pit-stop for pakodas!
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